Laughing with a mouth of blood

~ Sunday, August 12 ~
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Here is the reading list Aamna sent me, for everyone who asked. THANK YOU, COMRADE CHOONG. <33333

guydeboring:

·  Value, Price and Profit by Karl Marx (1865)

·  Critique of the Gotha Programme by Karl Marx (1875)

·  Socialism: Utopian and Scientific Frederick Engels (1880)

·  The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State by Frederick Engels (1884)

·  Ludwig Feuerbach and the End of Classical German Philosophy by Frederick Engels (1886)

·  The Meaning of Hegel by Georgi Plekhanov (1891)

·  On Historical Materialism by Franz Mehring (1893)

·  The Materialist Conception of History by Georgi Plekhanov (1897)

·  On The Role of The Individual in History by Georgi Plekhanov (1898)

·  Reform or Revolution by Rosa Luxemburg (1900)

·  What is to be done? by Vladimir Lenin (1902)

·  Materialism and Empirio-Criticism by Vladimir Lenin (1908)

·  Elements of Dialectics/On Dialectics by Vladimir Lenin (1914)

·  The Right of Nations to Self-Determination by Vladimir Lenin (1914)

·  The Collapse of the Second International by Vladimir Lenin (1915)

·  Imperialism: the Highest Stage of Capitalism by Vladimir Lenin (1917)

·  The State and Revolution by Vladimir Lenin (1918)

·  The Proletarian Revolution and the Renegade Kautsky by Vladimir Lenin (1918)

·  Left Wing Communism an Infantile Disorder by Vladimir Lenin (1920)

·  The Third International after Lenin by Leon Trotsky (1928)

·  The Permanent Revolution by Leon Trotsky (1931)

·  Fascism: What it is and How to Fight it? by Leon Trotsky (1932)

·  The Revolution Betrayed by Leon Trotsky (1936)

·  The Transitional Program by Leon Trotsky (1938)

·  Their Morals and Ours by Leon Trotsky (1938)

·  In Defense of Marxism by Leon Trotsky (1940)

·  Lenin and Trotsky: What they really stood for by Ted Grant and Alan Woods (1969)

·  Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses by Louis Althusser (1970)

·  Dialectical Logic by Evald Ilyenkov (1974)

Tags: Information Links
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~ Friday, June 8 ~
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~ Wednesday, June 6 ~
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~ Sunday, June 3 ~
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c4ss:

The Individualist &amp; The Communist: A Dialogue
By Voltairine de Cleyre and Rosa Slobodinsky
“Capitalistic Anarchism? Oh, yes, if you choose to call it so. Names are indifferent to me; I am not afraid of bugaboos. Let it be so, then, capitalistic Anarchism. Yea, we hold that comparative equality will obtain, but pre-arrangement, institution, ‘direction’ can never bring the desired result-free society. Waving the point that any arrangement is a blow at progress, it really is an impossible thing to do. Thoughts, like things, grow. You cannot jump from the germ to perfect tree in a moment. No system of society can be instituted today which will apply to the demands of the future; that, under freedom will adjust itself. This is the essential difference between Communism and cooperation. The one fixes, adjusts, arranges things, and tends to the rigidity which characterizes the cast off shells of past societies; the other trusts to the unfailing survival of the fittest, and the broadening of human sympathies with freedom; the surety that that which is in the line of progress tending toward the industrial ideal, will, in a free field, obtain by force of its superior attraction. Now, you must admit, either that there will be under freedom, different social arrangements in different societies, some Communistic, others quite the reverse, and that competition will necessarily rise between them, leaving to results to determine which is the best, or you must crush competition, institute Communism, deny freedom, and fly in the face of progress. What the world needs, my friend, is not new methods of instituting things, but abolition of restrictions upon opportunity.”

c4ss:

The Individualist & The Communist: A Dialogue

By Voltairine de Cleyre and Rosa Slobodinsky

“Capitalistic Anarchism? Oh, yes, if you choose to call it so. Names are indifferent to me; I am not afraid of bugaboos. Let it be so, then, capitalistic Anarchism. Yea, we hold that comparative equality will obtain, but pre-arrangement, institution, ‘direction’ can never bring the desired result-free society. Waving the point that any arrangement is a blow at progress, it really is an impossible thing to do. Thoughts, like things, grow. You cannot jump from the germ to perfect tree in a moment. No system of society can be instituted today which will apply to the demands of the future; that, under freedom will adjust itself. This is the essential difference between Communism and cooperation. The one fixes, adjusts, arranges things, and tends to the rigidity which characterizes the cast off shells of past societies; the other trusts to the unfailing survival of the fittest, and the broadening of human sympathies with freedom; the surety that that which is in the line of progress tending toward the industrial ideal, will, in a free field, obtain by force of its superior attraction. Now, you must admit, either that there will be under freedom, different social arrangements in different societies, some Communistic, others quite the reverse, and that competition will necessarily rise between them, leaving to results to determine which is the best, or you must crush competition, institute Communism, deny freedom, and fly in the face of progress. What the world needs, my friend, is not new methods of instituting things, but abolition of restrictions upon opportunity.”

Tags: Anarcho-Capitalism Anarchy Communism Control Freedom Links Rights Voltairine de Cleyre Market Anarchy Individuality
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~ Saturday, June 2 ~
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Why Corporate Capitalism is Unsustainable

c4ss:

I’m not a Marxist, but I find a lot of Marx’s ideas useful. Old Karl certainly had a gift for turning a phrase. Nobody who could come up with something as Proudhonian as “the associated producers” could be all bad. One of his best in my opinion was that new productive forces eventually “become incompatible with their capitalist integument,” at which point “the integument is burst asunder.”

Another source of vivid imagery is the Preamble to the Constitution of the Industrial Workers of the World. Consider this:  “… we are forming the structure of the new society within the shell of the old.”

These two phrases brilliantly describe the predicament of state-fostered corporate capitalism. Capitalism as an historic system is five hundred or more years old, and the state was intimately involved in its formation and its ongoing preservation from the very beginning. But the state has been far more involved, if such a thing is possible, in the model of corporate capitalism that’s prevailed over the past 150 years. The corporate titans that dominate our economic and political life could hardly survive for a year without the continuing intervention of the state in the market to sustain them through subsidies and monopoly protections.

This system is reaching its limits of sustainability. Here are some reasons why:

1) The monopolies on which it depends are increasingly unenforceable. Especially “intellectual property.”

1a) Copyright-based industry has already lost the fight to end file-sharing.

1b) Industrial patents are only enforceable when oligopoly industry, oligopoly retail chains reduce transaction cost of enforcement — unenforceable against neighborhood garage factories using pirated CAD/CAM files.

2) Cheap production tools and soil-efficient horticulture are

2a) increasing competition from self-employment

2b) reducing profitable investment opportunities for surplus capital and destroying direct rate of profit (DROP)

3) State-subsidized production inputs leads to geometrically increasing demand for those inputs, outstripping the state’s ability to supply and driving it into chronic fiscal crisis. For centuries the state has provided large-scale capitalist agribusiness with privileged access to land stolen from the laboring classes. For 150 years, it has subsidized inputs like railroads, airports and highways for long-distance shipping, and irrigation water for factory farming. But as any student of Microecon 101 could tell you, subsidizing something means more and more of it gets consumed. So you get agribusiness that’s inefficient in its use of land and water, and industry that achieves false economies of scale by producing for artificially large market areas. Each year it takes a larger government subsidy to keep this business model profitable.

4) Worsening tendencies toward overaccumulation and stagnation increase the amount of chronic deficit spending necessary for Keynesian aggregate demand management, also worsening the fiscal crisis. The state has built a massive military-industrial complex and created entire other industries at state expense to absorb excess investment capital and overcome the system’s tendency toward surplus production and surplus capital, and sustained larger and larger deficits, just to prevent the collapse that otherwise would have already occurred.

In short, capitalism depends on ever-growing amounts of state intervention in the market for its survival, and the system is hitting the point where the teat runs dry.

The result is a system in which governments and corporations are increasingly hollowed out. And meanwhile, growing up within this corporate capitalist “integument,” things like open source software and culture, open-source industrial design, permaculture and low-overhead garage micromanufacturing eat the corporate-state economy alive. An ever-growing share of labor and production are disappearing into relocalized resilient economies, self-employment, worker cooperatives and the informal and household economy. In the end, they will skeletonize the corporate dinosaurs like a swarm of piranha.

Tags: Corporatism Capitalism Karl Marx Economics Politics Rights Government Control Mutualism Anarchy Self-Sufficiency Links
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~ Friday, June 1 ~
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Presumption of Guilt Lays Foundation for U.S. Citizen Tax and Travel Laws

whakatikatika:

vulgartrader:

From Activist Post:

In what appears to be a growing movement in the United States Congress, at least two different pieces of legislation have been introduced during the course of this year that would involve the stripping of travel rights and the possession of passports for a variety of reasons.

The more draconian of the two bills, The Moving Ahead For Progress Act (MAP-21) S. 1813, actually allows for the “revocation or denial” of a passport for anyone who has delinquent or unpaid taxes. This is why Eric Blair of Activist Post has labeled it the “Keeping the Slaves on the Plantation Act.”

Section 40304 of the bill states in clear language, “that any individual has a seriously delinquent tax debt in an amount in excess of $50,000, the Secretary shall transmit such certification to the Secretary of State for action with respect to denial, revocation, or limitation of a passport.”

Read the rest here

Depressing.

Tags: Government Control Travel Passport Taxes Rights Freedom Links
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An article on the U.S. government’s entrapment cases against anarchists recently, and how this has happened in the recent past with Muslims and environmental activists.

noneofthismatters:

And Now They Are Coming For You.

An article on the state’s entrapment cases against anarchists recently, and how this has happened in the recent past with Muslims and environmental activists.

We live in an exciting time where it can be reasonably believed that the current ruling order can be overthrown and an entirely new world can flourish in it’s place. Entire governments have been brought down, insurrections nurtured and pushed to their most subversive ends, and people across the globe anticipate a coming, perhaps winnable, clash between themselves and power. However, it is also a scary time to call yourself an anarchist, with the media and whole governments inflating fears of anarchist “terrorism”, bomb-plots, and attacks. In recent months, 10 people have been brought up on conspiracy charges. Each of these cases is similar; an FBI informant finds young idealistic people involved on the periphery of protest movements and pushes them toward radical action, only to later arrest them after they have been pushed. In this special article from a comrade in the bay area, they discuss how strategies classically used against revolutionaries have come to be more broadly applied to other groups of people, as though they too are seen by the state as combatants and potential insurgents.

In Modesto, we’ve already seen police target anarchists for repression, as was the case when the Stanislaus County Sheriffs launched a sting operation against an underground needle exchange in order to “rid the parks of anarchists and junkies,” as head Sheriff Adam Christianson explained before the Board of Supervisors. In 2006, an Auburn anarchist, Eric McDavid, was sentenced to 20 years in prison after being entrapped by an FBI informant without even carrying out an action. While we have seen the state act against anarchists in this area, we also have seen the targeting of whole groups of people based on the neighborhood they live in or their immigration status. When the needle exchange was shut down, people reacted with solidarity: dropping banners, holding demonstrations, packing the courtroom, and throwing benefits to raise money, but what was our response when immigration officials raided a Modesto area flea market, carting away children under the pretext of looking for pirate DVDs? Where was the rage when the city of Modesto declared entire neighborhoods under gang injunctions, which in colonial fashion created curfews, forbade people from associating with each other, and hindered the movements of entire groups of people?

We should not be surprised at state repression against radicals when such strategies are used by the government against huge segments of the population. Generalized surveillance, mass incarceration, the ubiquitous exploitation of migrant workers terrorized to silence through the constant threat of deportation, and gang injunctions which keep poor communities of color fractured and isolated are all part of a social war waged against the very population itself. With these first forays into the domestication of warfare into every day fabric of our lives, is it any wonder that the state would target those who already proclaim themselves combatants in just such a war?

Read More

Tags: Anarchy Entrapment Domestic Terrorist Government Control Rights Environmentalist Muslim Police Illegal Surveillance Protest Activism Links
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~ Thursday, May 31 ~
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US Strikes Fueling al-Qaeda Sympathy in Yemen

arielnietzsche:

It’s an old story, but one that officials never seem to see coming. As the US dramatically escalates its war in Yemen, pounding cities in and around the southern Abyan Province, the Yemenis being attacked are starting to take it personally.

“These attacks are making people say, ‘We now believe that al-Qaeda is on the right side,” one Yemeni noted, adding that both of his brothers, a school teacher and a cellphone repairman, had been killed in US attacks in March.

Long a US client state, the installation of US-backed ruler Major General Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi in a single candidate election has given everything the regime does the taint of a US imprimatur. Yemeni troops are constantly attacking tribal areas, shelling towns and insisting that everyone killed is “al-Qaeda.

And while those reports from the Defense Ministry play well in the international media, they are less impressive in Abyan itself, where the civilian population knows that they’ve lost relatives in this war, and that whatever else they may think about the militant zealots in their midst, they aren’t the ones dropping bombs on them.

Tags: Foreign Policy Yemen Drone al Qaeda Government Control Terrorism War Middle East Rights Links
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Permalink Tags: Propaganda Government Media Brain Washed Control Rights Freedom Links
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sven2:

You can identify poor neighborhoods from space

Tim De Chant at Per Square Mile has noted that rich urban areas have way, way more trees than poor areas in the same city. In fact, the difference is so stark that income inequality can be seen from space. The satellite images above are low-income West Oakland and high-income Piedmont, and I probably don’t have to tell you which is which.
De Chant has collected images from four U.S. cities and two international cities, and in every one, the wealthier areas are conspicuously more leafy. Since trees increase property values, this is a classic case of the rich being given whatever they need to get richer. And considering the other things trees do for us, it’s also a case of the rich getting to be smarter, cooler, and have fewer allergies.

sven2:

You can identify poor neighborhoods from space

Tim De Chant at Per Square Mile has noted that rich urban areas have way, way more trees than poor areas in the same city. In fact, the difference is so stark that income inequality can be seen from space. The satellite images above are low-income West Oakland and high-income Piedmont, and I probably don’t have to tell you which is which.

De Chant has collected images from four U.S. cities and two international cities, and in every one, the wealthier areas are conspicuously more leafy. Since trees increase property values, this is a classic case of the rich being given whatever they need to get richer. And considering the other things trees do for us, it’s also a case of the rich getting to be smartercooler, and have fewer allergies.

Tags: Control Environment Life Nature Privilege Society Wage gap Links
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~ Friday, May 25 ~
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~ Wednesday, May 23 ~
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Went to 6th street in Austin, overconfident in my casual drinking abilities: Got drunk and threw up on markets not capitalism.

thesepostsarenotcoercive:

-but then I made up for it by buying a lysander spooner book a few days later @ BraveNewBooks. I’m extremely disappointed by their market anarchy section. there was only 4 books, and one of them was misplaced. so I guess that just makes 3…

-but what can I say except fuck yes and thank you to any bookstore with a clearly marked section for market anarchism— let alone anarchism in general.

How do you throw up on that book!? ha

Source: http://radgeek.com/gt/2011/10/Markets-Not-Capitalism-2011-Chartier-and-Johnson.pdf

Tags: Economics Markets Not Capitalism Free Market Gary Chartier Charles Johnson Mutualism Anarchy Anarchism Community Links
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~ Saturday, May 19 ~
Permalink Tags: TIME Magazine Propaganda Brain Washed Control Education Pictures Links
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