Laughing with a mouth of blood

~ Monday, April 1 ~
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This blog has become monotonous as far as I’m concerned. Don’t expect much from me.

I’ll be back in england (london, manchester & liverpool) the 22nd-30th of april, send me a message if you want to try and meet up. If anyone gets down to south texas, same offer. See y’all around.


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~ Sunday, March 31 ~
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anarcho-queer:

NYPD Stalks, Harass And Monitors Youth To Dissuade Them From Committing Crimes
It’s like Father Connoly’s attempts to keep kids on the straight and narrow, but with fake Facebook accounts of hot teen chicks. The New York Times reports on an innovative (and highly invasive) program to keep kids who’ve been arrested from committing robbery.
The involuntary NYPD program called  Juvenile Robbery Intervention Program (JRIP) targets youth (almost exclusively minorities living in housing) and subjects them to continual harassment at their school, home and in the streets and monitors their every move online with fake profiles:

Officers not only make repeated drop-ins at homes and schools, but they also drive up to the teenagers in the streets, shouting out hellos, in front of their friends. The force’s Intelligence Division also deciphers each teenager’s street name and gang affiliation. Detectives compile a binder on each teenager that includes photos from Facebook and arrest photos of the teenager’s associates, not unlike the flow charts generated by law enforcement officials to track organized crime. 
Detectives spend hours, day and night, monitoring the Facebook pages and Twitter accounts of teenagers in the program, known as the Juvenile Robbery Intervention Program, or J-RIP, and of their criminal associates. To do so, detectives create a dummy Facebook page — perhaps employing a fake profile of an attractive teenage girl — and send out “friend requests” as bait to get beyond the social network’s privacy settings. 

Joanne Jaffe, the department’s Housing Bureau chief, commented on the program saying, “We are coming to find you and monitor every step you take”. “And we are going to learn about every bad friend you have. And you’re going to get alienated from those friends because we are going to be all over you.” Talk about creepy…
The program was started in 2007 in Brownsville, known as the highest concentration of low income public housing development in the North America and the worst neighborhood in New York City. In 2009, the program was expanded to East Harlem, the second highest concentration of public housing in the nation, closely following Brownsville. Both Brownsville and East Harlem are largely black and Latino, making over 85% of the population in each neighborhood, meaning JRIP disproportionately targets minorities who live in public housing and subjects them to continual harassment by the NYPD who claim to be practicing tough love.

anarcho-queer:

NYPD Stalks, Harass And Monitors Youth To Dissuade Them From Committing Crimes

It’s like Father Connoly’s attempts to keep kids on the straight and narrow, but with fake Facebook accounts of hot teen chicks. The New York Times reports on an innovative (and highly invasive) program to keep kids who’ve been arrested from committing robbery.

The involuntary NYPD program called Juvenile Robbery Intervention Program (JRIP) targets youth (almost exclusively minorities living in housing) and subjects them to continual harassment at their school, home and in the streets and monitors their every move online with fake profiles:

Officers not only make repeated drop-ins at homes and schools, but they also drive up to the teenagers in the streets, shouting out hellos, in front of their friends. The force’s Intelligence Division also deciphers each teenager’s street name and gang affiliation. Detectives compile a binder on each teenager that includes photos from Facebook and arrest photos of the teenager’s associates, not unlike the flow charts generated by law enforcement officials to track organized crime.

Detectives spend hours, day and night, monitoring the Facebook pages and Twitter accounts of teenagers in the program, known as the Juvenile Robbery Intervention Program, or J-RIP, and of their criminal associates. To do so, detectives create a dummy Facebook page — perhaps employing a fake profile of an attractive teenage girl — and send out “friend requests” as bait to get beyond the social network’s privacy settings.

Joanne Jaffe, the department’s Housing Bureau chief, commented on the program saying, “We are coming to find you and monitor every step you take”. “And we are going to learn about every bad friend you have. And you’re going to get alienated from those friends because we are going to be all over you.” Talk about creepy…

The program was started in 2007 in Brownsville, known as the highest concentration of low income public housing development in the North America and the worst neighborhood in New York City. In 2009, the program was expanded to East Harlem, the second highest concentration of public housing in the nation, closely following Brownsville. Both Brownsville and East Harlem are largely black and Latino, making over 85% of the population in each neighborhood, meaning JRIP disproportionately targets minorities who live in public housing and subjects them to continual harassment by the NYPD who claim to be practicing tough love.


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~ Saturday, March 30 ~
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Like many other colonial territories, in 1946 Hawai’i was inscribed onto the United Nations List of Non-Self-Governing Territories. As such, Hawai’i was eligible for decolonization under international law. However, the United States—in clear violation of UN policies and international law of the time and existing through the present—predetermined statehood as the status for Hawai’i. The 1959 ballot in which the people of Hawai’i voted to become a state of the union included only two options: incorporation and remaining a US colonial territory. In addition—among those who were allowed to take part in the vote that eventually marked Hawai’i’s supposed transition from colonial status—Hawaiians were outnumbered by settlers as well as military personnel.
— J. Kēhaulani Kauanui (The Politics of Hawaiian Blood and Sovereignty in Rice v. Cayetano)

(Source: nitanahkohe)


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~ Friday, March 29 ~
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Written by Michael Santos The Internet did not exist when I began serving my prison sentence in 1987. I didn’t have direct access to the Internet as it dawned onto popular culture and became mainstream for many Americans, throughout the “You’ve got mail!” craze of the ’90s. Years would pass, until my release from prison in 2012 before I’d be able to experience the Internet first hand. While I served my prison sentence, I frequently dreamed of using the Internet. From reading numerous technology magazines and financial newspapers, I perceived the web as a powerful tool. From my perspective, it would become more influential to the advancement of society than television, radio and the telephone combined.

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~ Thursday, March 28 ~
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It’s been ten years since that clown-prince buffoon waded us into a terrible war of choice for the benefit of his oily buddies. Just days before the 48 hours expired, millions of people around the world, myself included, took to the streets to try to stop this war. But no avail because the United States is not a democracy and couldn’t care less about domestic or international opinion. I was joined by the woman I would eventually marry and a tiny puppy. The dog has died, the woman has left me, but the war goes on. I think that is a fitting epigraph for American Imperialism, War: Lasts longer than love and man’s best friend.
— John Karl Marsland, AIA Committee Member (via disobey)

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~ Wednesday, March 27 ~
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~ Tuesday, March 26 ~
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motherearthnewsmag:



HOMEGROWN Life: What We Learned From Our Year Without Groceries



By Farm Aid and Homegrown.org

en a year now since we started our year without groceries. We learned a lot in that year. We are definitely healthier, but also we’re happier. Our relationship with each other is stronger as we’ve had to learn how to really work well together.

motherearthnewsmag:

HOMEGROWN Life: What We Learned From Our Year Without Groceries


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Permalink Tags: Syria Foreign Policy CIA News
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~ Monday, March 25 ~
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